'Ardrey delivers a bombshell... fascinating stuff'
- Los Angeles Times

'A brilliant piece of detective work... enthralling'
- Scots Magazine

Page 1 of 3 > >>
Dec 28, 2016

 

28th December 2016

Camelot? Dunadd or Stirling?

A reader, P****, wrote:

"If I may, I just want to throw out there that my own opinion is that Camelot was actually at Stirling Castle or its environs, not Dunadd.  Have a number of reasons for that but curious if you have perhaps came to a similar conclusion."

I replied that day,

"I would have no problem with Camelot being at Stirling, because Stirling was Arthur Mac Aedan’s primary base; but for the fact that, except for this being Arthur’s primary base, I do not know of any evidence that connects Stirling and Camelot… except…

Wait a minute!

I said Dunadd was mostly likely Camelot because this was one of Arthur’s bases, and because Camelot made sense as a corruption of the Gaelic for Twisted March, which fitted the land about Dunadd. It is arguable that it also fitted the land about Stirling."

Jury still out?

 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 26, 2016

9th June 2016

Arthur and Moses

If I had been an Israelite and someone had parted the Red Sea to let me go safely across I think I would have remembered that, and not gone gamboling about a Golden Calf ten minutes later.

But some people take more convincing than others.

So...

Merlin's teacher was said to be a man called Blaise.

This is just a corrupt version of the Gaelic for Blasphemer - Blaispheum.

This makes sense if Arthur was Arthur Mac Aedan, a Scot.

If he was not Arthur Mac Aedan it is a non-sense name.

 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 12, 2016

5th June 2016 #2

History Deniers and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

My last blog was more accessible than the one before but...

...let's cut to the chase.

It was said in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance - "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend."

Nonsense.

The legend of Arthur has become fact. We should print the facts.

Arthur (c.559-596CE) and Merlin (c.540-c.618CE) were real historical figures. 

If you disagree - perhaps you are a history denier?

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 12, 2016

30th May 2016

There is no historical Arthur in the south, far less a Glein battlefield.

In the north, we have an historical Arthur and a Glein battlefield and they are self-corroborating.

The Glein Challenge 

If you Google-search 'Arthur and Glein' you will not be able to find a sensible location for the legendary Arthur’s legendary battle of Glein. (The battle of the River Glein is the first Arthur-battle on the battle-list of Nennius.)

The battle of the River Glein only makes sense with reference to Arthur Mac Aedan.

Arthur Mac Aedan’s father Aedan won the battle of Delgon in 574CE.

In Finding Arthur I identified the Delgon battlefield as Ealain da Ghallagan, West Loch Tarbert, Argyll, Scotland.

In 574CE Arthur/Arthur Mac Aedan was about sixteen years old and about to embark on the military career that would make him famous.

Given the battle of the River Glein is the first Arthur-battle on the battle-list of Nennius it is reasonable to suppose, if the battles on the list are in chronological order, that Arthur was relatively young when it was fought. 

(I have shown in Finding Arthur that the battles on the battle-list of Nennius were fought in Chronological order.)

I was unable to find a single, sensible location for the River Glein battlefield when I was writing Finding Arthur.

I came to the conclusion that there was no one single battle of the River Glein. I concluded that as Arthur was a young man, enjoyng his first independent command, he was probably only in charge of mopping-up operations in the aftermath of Delgon, and that, consequently, the reference to the battle of the River Glein should properly be understood as the battles of the rivers and the glens.

I looked everywhere except one place, right under my nose.

In 2014 a German scholar, Kurt Leibhard, following-up on my work, found the answer.

I had been right that the young Arthur had been engaged in mopping-up after Delgon, but not that this involved a guerrilla campaign fought by generic rivers and in generic glens.

Kurt Leibhard found the battlefield of the River Glein two kilometres from Arthur Mac Aedan's father's Delgon battlefield (which I had located at Ealain da Ghallagan).

Two kilometers from Delgon-Ealain da Ghallagan is Abhainn Gillean – that is, the River Gillean.

The names River Glein and River Gillean are similar in the extreme, if not synonymous.

The location, smack bang next to Aedan’s Delgon, fits perfectly.

The timing, immediately after Delgon, when Arthur was young, and so unlikely to be in command in a great battle and more likely to be in command in a follow-up battle, clearly makes sense.

The questions, who; where; when; why? all have answers if the River Glein is Abhainn Gillean.

This is self-corroborating evidence.

This evidence is too much of a coincidence to be mere chance.

I challenge everyone to come up with a better Glein battlefield.

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 4, 2016
1st May 2016

Why Scotland should be independent and why Scotland should not be independent.

Warner Bros 'King Arthur' trilogy, the first film of which will be released in March 2017, will atrract tourists to Tintagel and Glastonbury but not to Scotland unless Scotland does... something.

Tintagel

Tintagel has no historical Arthur.

Tintagel is only connected with Arthur because Geoffrey of Monmouth, who wanted to curry favour with his patron who owned the place, wrote about Tintagel it in his Arthur blockbuster, The History of the Kings of Britain.

Check English Heritage’s website – the whole tourist industry of the Tintagel area is based on this fiction.

Glastonbury

Glastonbury too has no historical Arthur.

Glastonbury is only connected with Arthur because the monks of Glastonbury needed money to repair their monastery after it burned down in the late 12th century, and so they said they had ‘discovered’ Arthur’s grave. Arthur brought tourists (pilgrims) and tourists brought money.

Check out Glastonbury’s website - Glastonbury's whole tourist industry is based on this scam.

Scotland

Unlike Tintagel and Glastonbury Scotland has an historical Arthur - Arthur Mac Aedan (c.559-596CE).

Unlike Tintagel and Glastonbury, Scotland no Arthur-tourist industry. 

If Scotland was populated by Americans, something would have been done about this by now.

This is why Scotland should be independent and this is also why Scotland should not be independent.

We should do something about this.

 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 4, 2016

16th May 2016

Where is Avalon?

Avalon is said to be an island "set in the western sea" where Arthur was taken after his death.

These are the essentials. You can forget all that Arthur is not-dead and is coming back stuff - we are talking of history here, not of the supernatural.

I say Iona was Avalon.

Iona is set in the Western Sea and was the burial place of the historical Arthur Mac Aedan’s family.  

There is a fair wheen of other evidence (anent the name, the church and the women who took Arthur to Avalon, for example) but I am sticking to the essentials here.

If anyone knows of a more likely Avalon than Iona, let me know.

Here are three alternatives:

Oxford Dictionary of Celtic Mythology – “… [Avalon] usually thought to lie in the western seas but sometimes identified with Glastonbury.” Note that ‘but’. That ‘but’ is there because Glastonbury is inland; that is, Glastonbury is not an island. This is usually explained by claiming that Glastonbury was marshier then than it is now – but this is bunkum. Besides, Glastonbury has no Arthur, far less a reason why any hypothetical Arthur might have been buried there.

Geoffrey Ashe in his The Discovery of King Arthur says “… the real Avalon is in Burgundy where Arthur’s career ends...” but “...his remains might have been brought back later for re-interment in [Glastonbury].” Glastonbury, Geoffrey Ashe says, "Glastonbury was not far from being an island early in the Christian era, when the water level was different.”  Note that “not far from being an island”. That is, Glastonbury was not an island. Not everyone is as honest as Geoffrey Ashe. Remember, Glastonbury has no ‘Arthur’. Geoffrey Ashe’s Arthur is a man called Riothamus who fought and died in France.

The estimable Stuart McHardy in his The Quest for Arthur says “...there is a good location for Avalon [in Scotland] within the environs of the [River] Forth… the Isle of May…” Besides the fact that the Isle of May is in the eastern, not the western sea there is nothing to connect it with an historical Arthur. On the same page Stuart McHardy says “we have a model [for the burial of Arthur] in Scottish historical practice in the Isle of Iona.”  Like W.F. Skene, Queen Victoria’s Historiographer Royal, who came so close so often, Stuart McHardy hears the echoes of the evidence but does not go on to make, what I think is, the obvious connection - Iona is Avalon.

In my book Iona was not a model for Avalon, Iona is Avalon - it is an Occam ’s Razor thing.

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 4, 2016

19th May 2016

Merlin's Grave - Drumelzier-Dunipace not Stobo (Duh!)

On page 125 Tim writes about the Scottish writer, George Chalmers. In his Caledonia (1807) Chalmers doubted that Merlin’s grave was at Drumelzier-Stobo, observing that Drumelzier-Stobo did not lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde, which is where he placed the Merlin legend’s origins.

I think Chalmers was right about Drumelzier-Stobo not being in the right place.

I 'found' another Drumellzier, Drumelzier-Dunipace, or, at least, I connected it with Merlin (the people who live there already knew it was there)- see Finding Merlin. 

Not only does Drumelzier-Dunipace lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde; it is also, as the Vita Merlini Silvestris says it is, 30 miles from Glasgow - Drumelzier-Dunippace is where it should be if it is the place where Merlin was buried.

Just as I said in my Where is Avalon? blog 16th May 2016 - people come so close and then miss the obvious. Of course, it may be, that Chalmers simply did not know about Drumelzier-Dunipace. 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
Jun 4, 2016

19th May 2016

Merlin: A Medieval Legend and its Dark Age Origins by Tim Clarkson

I read Tim Clarkson’s Merlin: A Medieval Legend and its Dark Age Origins with interest, it is especically good on the medieval legend bit. 

As for the origins bit, Tim and I disagree a bit.

For me, once the obvious fiction is recognised and put to one side the historical Merlin can be seen to be a man of the north, a man of Scotland, plain and simple.

As I understand Tim's Merlin he gives more weight to the southern, the Welsh sources. 

We also disagree about whether Merlin was a druid of the old way (me) or a Christian (Tim).

These are matters for antother day.

For now, I say again, the evidence, I repeat the evidence proves that Merlin was a man of the north - an historical figure.

The only reason people say he did not exist in history or that, if he did exist in history, he was of the south is becauase thet have not looked at the evidence. 

Worse, they have looked at the evidence, noted that it pointed north and decided to run with the traditional, convenient, fictional / southern Merlin.

In my book Merlin is an inconvenient truth, especially for Christians... but then, as I have just said, that is a matter for another day.

For now, I am pleased to have an ally in the Merlin was real and of the north argument.

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 29, 2016

19th May 2016 

Merlin’s Grave

I am reading Tim Clarkson’s Merlin at the moment. I haven’t found out who Tim’s historical Merlin is yet, but I still have 11 pages to go, and it is interesting, Arthur/Merlin stuff always is.

On page 125 Tim writes about the Scottish writer, George Chalmers. In his Caledonia (1807) Chalmers doubted that Merlin’s grave was at Drumelzier-Stobo, observing that Drumelzier-Stobo did not lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde, which is where he placed the Merlin legend’s origins.

I think Chalmers was right about Drumelzier-Stobo not being in the right place.

I 'found' another Drumellzier, Drumelzier-Dunipace, or, at least, I connected it with Merlin (the people who live there already knew it was there)- see Finding Merlin. 

Not only does Drumelzier-Dunipace lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde; it is also, as the Vita Merlini Silvestris says it is, 30 miles from Glasgow - Drumelzier-Dunippace is where it should be if it is the place where Merlin was buried.

Just as I said in my Where is Avalon? blog 16th May 2016 - people come so close and then miss the obvious. Of course, it may be, that Chalmers simply did not know about Drumelzier-Dunipace. 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

20th March 2016

'Merlin' and his sister Languoreth's home village found.

Last week it was reported that roadworks on the M74 had led to the finding of the 'medieval' Cadzow village - on the site of the village where 'Merlin' and his twin-sister Langoureth grew up in the mid-6th century. This find was made smack-bang next to the fort at Cadzow which I identified, in Finding Merlin, as the place where they lived

This ties in with the finding of the 'Round Table' in the shadow of Stirling Castle rock in 2011. (It was actually a round mound about which Arthur and his fellows sat.) I was putting the finishing touches on Finding Arthur when this find was made. 

I made these finds in history. The archaeologists made their finds on the ground.

Arthur & 'Merlin' make sense in Scotland and nowhere else.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

12th March 2016

Arthur in history - history based on evidence.

The histories of England and Wales do not include an Arthur who could be the man who inspired the legend. Scottish history does - Arthur Mac Aedan c.559-596CE.

Why is this not generally accepted?

There was a cover-up. (I know, I know, this smacks of 'conspiracy theory' but... well, there was a cover-up. )

The historical Arthur was covered-up and replaced with legend because Arthur was not a Christian. 

A non-Christian hero was not acceptable. The Christianity that was imposed from about c.563 CE onwards brooked no alternatives.

Look at the history of Christianity and tell me that a non-Christian hero would have been acceptable in a Christian world; that Christianity valued pluralism. 

The alternative to Christianity, which Arthur favoured, allowed women a proper, equal place in the world, and so was especially unacceptable.

My conclusions do not rely on the supernatural (that would be daft).

My conclusions rely on evidence from Christian sources. This is the best kind of evidence - evidence contrary to the interests of those who produce it. 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

9th January 2016

Too much -  too little

I should tidy up this first page - it has too much stuff in it (but I have too little time to do it).

There is also too little about what this is really about - history.

There was an historical Arthur (Arthur Mac Aedan c. 559-596) and an historical Merlin (Myrddin/Lailoken c.540-618).

Arthur was Scots/British and Merlin British/British: both lived in what is now Scotland. They were both people of the old way of the druids. Consequently, when Christianity took over, attempts were made to write them out of the picture. This didn't work and so they were presented in a Christian light, but this doesn't quite work either. 

Semi-detached from history Arthur and Merlin have become legendary figures. 

However, when the surviving evidence is considered Arthur and Merlin can be seen in a sensible historical / geographical context. 

It is hardly surprising that Arthur has been presented as a Christian-English-King because Christian, English monarchists (i.e. those in charge) wrote the histories. 

But, if you look again at the evidence you will see that all makes sense when the setting is Scotland in the late 6th century CE.

For example, the sword and the stone event really happened (at Dunadd, Argyll, in 574CE) and happened without magic.

My books do not depend on supernatural stuff because... well, that would be daft. 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

28th November 2015

Glastonbury and Arthur rubbished.

Last week The Times and other newspapers revealed that the Glastonbury-Arthur connection is nonsense - although why anyone though this was 'news' is a mystery. This has been well known for decades.

The monks of Glastonbury wanted money and so they 'discovered' Arthur's body and used it to bring in tourist-pilgrims - Duh!

The monks even 'found' a cross upon which were written the words here lies King Arthur &c. (as I said in Finding Arthur - everything but directions to and the opening hours of the gift shop).

Glastonbury is still making millions out of this nonsense.

Scotland, the home of the real historical Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, does nothing.

 

 

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

19th November 2015

Arthur & Thomas Paine

I have just been told that my publishers - Overlook NY USA - are reprinting the paperback of Finding Arthur.

More and more people - people who have considered the evidence in Finding Merlin and Finding Arthur - are coming to the conclusion that the legendary Arthur was the historical Arthur Mac Aedan. 

This conclusion does not involve 'magic' or 'miracles' (which are non-sense) or anything supernatural - just evidence of fact.

The matter of Arthur is, pace Thomas Paine, a The World is my Country and Truth is my Religion Kind of Thing.

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

3rd October 2015

Expedition Unknown – TV Show - The One About Arthur

The Sword and the Stone

The battlefield of Badon

Camelot

The second series of the American TV show Expedition Unknown kicks off on 7th October with the first showing on USA TV of the one about my findings about Arthur (well, two of my findings anyway).

We filmed this in Argyll in April – with me on a horse for the first time ever.

This show deals with the stone from which an historical Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, really did take a sword (in 574 CE) and, perhaps, (I haven’t seen it yet) the battlefield of Badon.

For the purposes of identifying the legendary Arthur the most important battle on the Battle-list of Nennius is the legendary Arthur’s battle of Badon.

The battlefield of Badon is smack-bang next to the stone from which Arthur Mac Aedan took a sword in 574CE. The modern place-name Badden (which can be found on Google maps) like the legendary place-name Badon are both corruptions of the personal name Baodan (a relative of Arthur Mac Aedan’s).

It may Expedition Unknown will go with Camelot, a corrupt version of the Gaelic for twisted/crooked marsh, a perfect description of the land smack-bang next to – yup, you’ve guessed it - the stone from which Arthur Mac Aedan took a sword in 574CE.

And two miles away there is… there is lots more – enough for another documentary.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

2nd October 2015

Arthur and MacBeth

Inspired by Michael Fassbender's film MacBeth The Independent (today page 39) explains how it came to be that the good Scottish king Macbeth ended up a villain in most people's eyes.

"How did the tale get so twisted? The biggest reason is that history is written by the victors - in this case, the English. They viewed MacBeth through the lens of their own culture, and to top things off, later purged all Scottish literature written in Gaelic. What was finally recorded was heavily influenced by oral tradition and classic Celtic exaggera..., ah, storytelling."

Much the same thing happened to the historical Arthur.

Plus ca change... err...catches the worm (as one of my Coatbridge hometown fellows once said).

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

16th September 2015

The Stone of Dunadd from which Arthur (Arthur Mac Aedan) really did take a sword (no magic was involved in the making of the sword and the stone legend)

I climbed Dunadd hillfort on Saturday, for the umpteenth time: this time in pouring rain.

On the summit of Dunadd is the footprint into which, in 574CE, Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, put his foot as part of an inauguration ceremony. He was given a sword to hold, just as the Queen was given a  sword to hold at her coronation. When Arthur Mac Aedan stepped out of the footprint, holding the sword, he literally took a sword from a stone - no magic was involved.

This historical event was later sexed-up until now we have the wonderful fiction that is the story of The Sword in the Stone.

Anyone who knows about the legendary Arthur knows about the battle of Badon - this was fought on land that is contiguous with Dunadd (See Blog 3rd September 2015).

In April, led by an American TV team, I walked south from Dunadd across a marsh to a tussock with some stones on it. When I saw this tussock again on Saturday I thought - This tussock is further from Dunadd than I thought at the time, and at the time I thought it was pretty far. (You try walking across a marsh in the dark and you will see what I mean).  

The next day I wrote to the National Museum of Scotland to find out about the stones we saw on the tussock but... no reply.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

3rd September 2015

Johnny came lately and to the wrong place.

There is an article in The Independent today in which someone claims to have discovered that Arthur was a man of Scotand - Duh! I proved this years ago.

The litmus test for the historical Arthur is the battle of Badon.

This someone says that Badon was not fought in the north, like all the other battles, but in the far south, in Wiltshire. Why a Northern Arthur would have marched south to fight a battle in Wiltshire is a mystery. 

However, this someone goes on to say that the litmus-test-battle-of-Badon was "not to do with Arthur at all." Eh?

The fact is Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan was at Dunadd/Dunardry, Argyll, circa 574 - this is not disputed - and the land between Dunadd and Dunardry is still, to this day, called Badden (like Badon a corrupt version of Boadan, the name of Arthur Mac Aedan's distant cousin).

It was on the land of Badden that in circa 588 Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan fought and won the battle of Badon.

Why complicate things?

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

24 August 2015 

History is Politics - Palmyra

Shocking news today - a temple in Palmyra has been destroyed. Destroy a people’s history and you destroy a people. Palmyra is a part of human history. Its destruction is an assault on all humanity.

It has been ever thus.

Edinburgh fell to the Angles in c. 638 CE. The Britons who lived there fled south as refugees taking with them the stories of the time, in the late 6th century, when, under Arthur and ‘Merlin,' they had been part of an allied army that had defeated the Angles.

The southern Britons had not been so successful - they did not have an Arthur or a 'Merlin' - and so the southern Britons adopted the northern Arthur and ‘Merlin’ as their own.

This is why there is no historically identifiable or geographically sensible Arthur or ‘Merlin’ in the south. In the south the stories are all over the place, because, in the south they are just stories.

In the north, in Scotland - things are different.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

19th August 2015

Edinburgh Festival

A few moments ago I was listening to a guide tell festival-goers about the Stone of Destiny (which, there is reason to believe is in Argyll) but not about Arthur's Seat which is just down road, at the end of the Royal Mile.

Arthur's Seat comemorates Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan's victories in the four battle's of the first part of the Great Angle War fought in the 580s. 

IN MEMORY OF KHALED ASAAD, CUSTODIAN OF PALMYRA, WHO WAS BEHEADED AND WHOSE BODY WAS HUNG FROM A PILLAR IN PALMYRA, SYRIA, A FEW DAYS AGO.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

30th July 2015

Paperback - Finding Arthur

The paperback edition of Finding Arthur will be out tomorrow.

This contains evidence that proves, on the balance of probabilities, that Arthur was Arthur Mac Aedan.

Och, tae hell wi' it -  it proves it beyond reasonable doubt.

Q - So what?

A - See Whither Academia below.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

16th July 2015

Whither Academia? Glasgow Celtic Congress - July 2015

I was eventually allowed to attend the GCC, although, as they said, my request to be allowed to attend "stirred up a hornet's nest."

A professor from Spain claimed to have "discovered" that Arthur was Scottish: eight years after I proved this in Finding Merlin and two years after Finding Arthur nailed it.

He said his talk would “Revolutionise Celtic Studies to the end of time…” and “I give to the people of Scotland the gift of [the historical Arthur].”

Who his Arthur was, he didn't say.

His bull point was that he had, he said, located Arthur's long lost battlefield of Badon.

This, he said (without evidence) was Braydon in the far south of Britain, although, apparently, his Arthur (whoever his Arthur was) had not fought there; which was a bit of a downer

He also said no one had ever been able to explain the name Badon. I pointed out that it was a corrupt version of Baodan, a relative of Arthur Mac Aedan. Duh!

The lands of Baodan/Badon/Badden are there to be seen on Google Maps, Ordnance Survey maps &c. 

They are smack-bang next to where, in 574, Arthur Mac Aedan took part in the ceremony that inspired the fictional sword and the stone episode (see infra).

Whither academia?

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

7th July 2015

Celebrate Scotland

Yesterday Celebrate Scotland published a piece about my Finding Arthur

https://www.celebrate-scotland.co.uk/News-and-Features/1816/Was_King_Arthur_actually_Scottish_New_research_assesses_the_evidence/

There is more evidence that the historical Arthur was Arthur Mac Aedan in this short piece than all the traditional he-was-a-man-of-the-south-of-Britain books have to offer for a southern British Arthur.

What southern British Arthur? There is not one.

It is about time we changed history, is it not?

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

6th July 2015

Undiscovered Scotland

If you have read Undiscovered Scotland's kind review and have any questions - just ask (or, better still, buy my books).

So, for example:

Was there an Excalibur?

Where was 'Merlin's' so called Magic Spring of Barenton?

How come people think that Arthur was a Christian, English King (when, he was not one of these things)?

Remember, I don't deal in magic, I deal in evidence, fact and history.

The evidence shows that in fact Arthur and 'Merlin' are to be found in history, in late 6th c. Scotland.

Unless, of course, you know better.

No one has so far.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>
May 22, 2016

30th June 2015

Undiscovered Scotland - review

A selection from a recent review in Undiscovered Scotland - thank you Undiscovered Scotland - full review on

http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usreviews/books/duckwortharthur.html

"... Ardrey demonstrates how all the "facts" we know, or think we know, about Arthur can neatly be slotted into the Scottish landscape. Avalon, Camelot and Arthur's twelve recorded battles can all be shown to have had a Scottish context, as can legends such as the Round Table, Excalibur and The Sword in the Stone. 

If any of this was obvious, then there would have been nothing new or different for Ardrey to write.

As you read the author's account... you know that there will be many historians left unhappy with at least some of the conclusions. But given the problems many of those same historians have had finding convincing candidates for Arthur, what emerges from Ardrey's book has a sense of underlying rightness... we emerged with the strong sense that Adam Ardrey's Arthur comes closer to the real man behind the legend than any other interpretation we've read or seen."

Yup, thanks again Undiscovered Scotland.

 

Category:General
View and add comments >>
Page 1 of 3 > >>

Categories