'Ardrey delivers a bombshell... fascinating stuff'
- Los Angeles Times

'A brilliant piece of detective work... enthralling'
- Scots Magazine

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May 29, 2016

19th May 2016 

Merlin’s Grave

I am reading Tim Clarkson’s Merlin at the moment. I haven’t found out who Tim’s historical Merlin is yet, but I still have 11 pages to go, and it is interesting, Arthur/Merlin stuff always is.

On page 125 Tim writes about the Scottish writer, George Chalmers. In his Caledonia (1807) Chalmers doubted that Merlin’s grave was at Drumelzier-Stobo, observing that Drumelzier-Stobo did not lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde, which is where he placed the Merlin legend’s origins.

I think Chalmers was right about Drumelzier-Stobo not being in the right place.

I 'found' another Drumellzier, Drumelzier-Dunipace, or, at least, I connected it with Merlin (the people who live there already knew it was there)- see Finding Merlin. 

Not only does Drumelzier-Dunipace lie close to the heartland of Strathclyde; it is also, as the Vita Merlini Silvestris says it is, 30 miles from Glasgow - Drumelzier-Dunippace is where it should be if it is the place where Merlin was buried.

Just as I said in my Where is Avalon? blog 16th May 2016 - people come so close and then miss the obvious. Of course, it may be, that Chalmers simply did not know about Drumelzier-Dunipace. 

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May 22, 2016

20th March 2016

'Merlin' and his sister Languoreth's home village found.

Last week it was reported that roadworks on the M74 had led to the finding of the 'medieval' Cadzow village - on the site of the village where 'Merlin' and his twin-sister Langoureth grew up in the mid-6th century. This find was made smack-bang next to the fort at Cadzow which I identified, in Finding Merlin, as the place where they lived

This ties in with the finding of the 'Round Table' in the shadow of Stirling Castle rock in 2011. (It was actually a round mound about which Arthur and his fellows sat.) I was putting the finishing touches on Finding Arthur when this find was made. 

I made these finds in history. The archaeologists made their finds on the ground.

Arthur & 'Merlin' make sense in Scotland and nowhere else.

 

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May 22, 2016

12th March 2016

Arthur in history - history based on evidence.

The histories of England and Wales do not include an Arthur who could be the man who inspired the legend. Scottish history does - Arthur Mac Aedan c.559-596CE.

Why is this not generally accepted?

There was a cover-up. (I know, I know, this smacks of 'conspiracy theory' but... well, there was a cover-up. )

The historical Arthur was covered-up and replaced with legend because Arthur was not a Christian. 

A non-Christian hero was not acceptable. The Christianity that was imposed from about c.563 CE onwards brooked no alternatives.

Look at the history of Christianity and tell me that a non-Christian hero would have been acceptable in a Christian world; that Christianity valued pluralism. 

The alternative to Christianity, which Arthur favoured, allowed women a proper, equal place in the world, and so was especially unacceptable.

My conclusions do not rely on the supernatural (that would be daft).

My conclusions rely on evidence from Christian sources. This is the best kind of evidence - evidence contrary to the interests of those who produce it. 

 

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May 22, 2016

9th January 2016

Too much -  too little

I should tidy up this first page - it has too much stuff in it (but I have too little time to do it).

There is also too little about what this is really about - history.

There was an historical Arthur (Arthur Mac Aedan c. 559-596) and an historical Merlin (Myrddin/Lailoken c.540-618).

Arthur was Scots/British and Merlin British/British: both lived in what is now Scotland. They were both people of the old way of the druids. Consequently, when Christianity took over, attempts were made to write them out of the picture. This didn't work and so they were presented in a Christian light, but this doesn't quite work either. 

Semi-detached from history Arthur and Merlin have become legendary figures. 

However, when the surviving evidence is considered Arthur and Merlin can be seen in a sensible historical / geographical context. 

It is hardly surprising that Arthur has been presented as a Christian-English-King because Christian, English monarchists (i.e. those in charge) wrote the histories. 

But, if you look again at the evidence you will see that all makes sense when the setting is Scotland in the late 6th century CE.

For example, the sword and the stone event really happened (at Dunadd, Argyll, in 574CE) and happened without magic.

My books do not depend on supernatural stuff because... well, that would be daft. 

 

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May 22, 2016

28th November 2015

Glastonbury and Arthur rubbished.

Last week The Times and other newspapers revealed that the Glastonbury-Arthur connection is nonsense - although why anyone though this was 'news' is a mystery. This has been well known for decades.

The monks of Glastonbury wanted money and so they 'discovered' Arthur's body and used it to bring in tourist-pilgrims - Duh!

The monks even 'found' a cross upon which were written the words here lies King Arthur &c. (as I said in Finding Arthur - everything but directions to and the opening hours of the gift shop).

Glastonbury is still making millions out of this nonsense.

Scotland, the home of the real historical Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, does nothing.

 

 

 

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May 22, 2016

19th November 2015

Arthur & Thomas Paine

I have just been told that my publishers - Overlook NY USA - are reprinting the paperback of Finding Arthur.

More and more people - people who have considered the evidence in Finding Merlin and Finding Arthur - are coming to the conclusion that the legendary Arthur was the historical Arthur Mac Aedan. 

This conclusion does not involve 'magic' or 'miracles' (which are non-sense) or anything supernatural - just evidence of fact.

The matter of Arthur is, pace Thomas Paine, a The World is my Country and Truth is my Religion Kind of Thing.

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May 22, 2016

3rd October 2015

Expedition Unknown – TV Show - The One About Arthur

The Sword and the Stone

The battlefield of Badon

Camelot

The second series of the American TV show Expedition Unknown kicks off on 7th October with the first showing on USA TV of the one about my findings about Arthur (well, two of my findings anyway).

We filmed this in Argyll in April – with me on a horse for the first time ever.

This show deals with the stone from which an historical Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, really did take a sword (in 574 CE) and, perhaps, (I haven’t seen it yet) the battlefield of Badon.

For the purposes of identifying the legendary Arthur the most important battle on the Battle-list of Nennius is the legendary Arthur’s battle of Badon.

The battlefield of Badon is smack-bang next to the stone from which Arthur Mac Aedan took a sword in 574CE. The modern place-name Badden (which can be found on Google maps) like the legendary place-name Badon are both corruptions of the personal name Baodan (a relative of Arthur Mac Aedan’s).

It may Expedition Unknown will go with Camelot, a corrupt version of the Gaelic for twisted/crooked marsh, a perfect description of the land smack-bang next to – yup, you’ve guessed it - the stone from which Arthur Mac Aedan took a sword in 574CE.

And two miles away there is… there is lots more – enough for another documentary.

 

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May 22, 2016

2nd October 2015

Arthur and MacBeth

Inspired by Michael Fassbender's film MacBeth The Independent (today page 39) explains how it came to be that the good Scottish king Macbeth ended up a villain in most people's eyes.

"How did the tale get so twisted? The biggest reason is that history is written by the victors - in this case, the English. They viewed MacBeth through the lens of their own culture, and to top things off, later purged all Scottish literature written in Gaelic. What was finally recorded was heavily influenced by oral tradition and classic Celtic exaggera..., ah, storytelling."

Much the same thing happened to the historical Arthur.

Plus ca change... err...catches the worm (as one of my Coatbridge hometown fellows once said).

 

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May 22, 2016

16th September 2015

The Stone of Dunadd from which Arthur (Arthur Mac Aedan) really did take a sword (no magic was involved in the making of the sword and the stone legend)

I climbed Dunadd hillfort on Saturday, for the umpteenth time: this time in pouring rain.

On the summit of Dunadd is the footprint into which, in 574CE, Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan, put his foot as part of an inauguration ceremony. He was given a sword to hold, just as the Queen was given a  sword to hold at her coronation. When Arthur Mac Aedan stepped out of the footprint, holding the sword, he literally took a sword from a stone - no magic was involved.

This historical event was later sexed-up until now we have the wonderful fiction that is the story of The Sword in the Stone.

Anyone who knows about the legendary Arthur knows about the battle of Badon - this was fought on land that is contiguous with Dunadd (See Blog 3rd September 2015).

In April, led by an American TV team, I walked south from Dunadd across a marsh to a tussock with some stones on it. When I saw this tussock again on Saturday I thought - This tussock is further from Dunadd than I thought at the time, and at the time I thought it was pretty far. (You try walking across a marsh in the dark and you will see what I mean).  

The next day I wrote to the National Museum of Scotland to find out about the stones we saw on the tussock but... no reply.

 

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May 22, 2016

3rd September 2015

Johnny came lately and to the wrong place.

There is an article in The Independent today in which someone claims to have discovered that Arthur was a man of Scotand - Duh! I proved this years ago.

The litmus test for the historical Arthur is the battle of Badon.

This someone says that Badon was not fought in the north, like all the other battles, but in the far south, in Wiltshire. Why a Northern Arthur would have marched south to fight a battle in Wiltshire is a mystery. 

However, this someone goes on to say that the litmus-test-battle-of-Badon was "not to do with Arthur at all." Eh?

The fact is Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan was at Dunadd/Dunardry, Argyll, circa 574 - this is not disputed - and the land between Dunadd and Dunardry is still, to this day, called Badden (like Badon a corrupt version of Boadan, the name of Arthur Mac Aedan's distant cousin).

It was on the land of Badden that in circa 588 Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan fought and won the battle of Badon.

Why complicate things?

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May 22, 2016

24 August 2015 

History is Politics - Palmyra

Shocking news today - a temple in Palmyra has been destroyed. Destroy a people’s history and you destroy a people. Palmyra is a part of human history. Its destruction is an assault on all humanity.

It has been ever thus.

Edinburgh fell to the Angles in c. 638 CE. The Britons who lived there fled south as refugees taking with them the stories of the time, in the late 6th century, when, under Arthur and ‘Merlin,' they had been part of an allied army that had defeated the Angles.

The southern Britons had not been so successful - they did not have an Arthur or a 'Merlin' - and so the southern Britons adopted the northern Arthur and ‘Merlin’ as their own.

This is why there is no historically identifiable or geographically sensible Arthur or ‘Merlin’ in the south. In the south the stories are all over the place, because, in the south they are just stories.

In the north, in Scotland - things are different.

 

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May 22, 2016

19th August 2015

Edinburgh Festival

A few moments ago I was listening to a guide tell festival-goers about the Stone of Destiny (which, there is reason to believe is in Argyll) but not about Arthur's Seat which is just down road, at the end of the Royal Mile.

Arthur's Seat comemorates Arthur, Arthur Mac Aedan's victories in the four battle's of the first part of the Great Angle War fought in the 580s. 

IN MEMORY OF KHALED ASAAD, CUSTODIAN OF PALMYRA, WHO WAS BEHEADED AND WHOSE BODY WAS HUNG FROM A PILLAR IN PALMYRA, SYRIA, A FEW DAYS AGO.

 

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May 22, 2016

30th July 2015

Paperback - Finding Arthur

The paperback edition of Finding Arthur will be out tomorrow.

This contains evidence that proves, on the balance of probabilities, that Arthur was Arthur Mac Aedan.

Och, tae hell wi' it -  it proves it beyond reasonable doubt.

Q - So what?

A - See Whither Academia below.

 

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May 22, 2016

16th July 2015

Whither Academia? Glasgow Celtic Congress - July 2015

I was eventually allowed to attend the GCC, although, as they said, my request to be allowed to attend "stirred up a hornet's nest."

A professor from Spain claimed to have "discovered" that Arthur was Scottish: eight years after I proved this in Finding Merlin and two years after Finding Arthur nailed it.

He said his talk would “Revolutionise Celtic Studies to the end of time…” and “I give to the people of Scotland the gift of [the historical Arthur].”

Who his Arthur was, he didn't say.

His bull point was that he had, he said, located Arthur's long lost battlefield of Badon.

This, he said (without evidence) was Braydon in the far south of Britain, although, apparently, his Arthur (whoever his Arthur was) had not fought there; which was a bit of a downer

He also said no one had ever been able to explain the name Badon. I pointed out that it was a corrupt version of Baodan, a relative of Arthur Mac Aedan. Duh!

The lands of Baodan/Badon/Badden are there to be seen on Google Maps, Ordnance Survey maps &c. 

They are smack-bang next to where, in 574, Arthur Mac Aedan took part in the ceremony that inspired the fictional sword and the stone episode (see infra).

Whither academia?

 

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May 22, 2016

7th July 2015

Celebrate Scotland

Yesterday Celebrate Scotland published a piece about my Finding Arthur

https://www.celebrate-scotland.co.uk/News-and-Features/1816/Was_King_Arthur_actually_Scottish_New_research_assesses_the_evidence/

There is more evidence that the historical Arthur was Arthur Mac Aedan in this short piece than all the traditional he-was-a-man-of-the-south-of-Britain books have to offer for a southern British Arthur.

What southern British Arthur? There is not one.

It is about time we changed history, is it not?

 

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May 22, 2016

6th July 2015

Undiscovered Scotland

If you have read Undiscovered Scotland's kind review and have any questions - just ask (or, better still, buy my books).

So, for example:

Was there an Excalibur?

Where was 'Merlin's' so called Magic Spring of Barenton?

How come people think that Arthur was a Christian, English King (when, he was not one of these things)?

Remember, I don't deal in magic, I deal in evidence, fact and history.

The evidence shows that in fact Arthur and 'Merlin' are to be found in history, in late 6th c. Scotland.

Unless, of course, you know better.

No one has so far.

 

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May 22, 2016

30th June 2015

Undiscovered Scotland - review

A selection from a recent review in Undiscovered Scotland - thank you Undiscovered Scotland - full review on

http://www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk/usreviews/books/duckwortharthur.html

"... Ardrey demonstrates how all the "facts" we know, or think we know, about Arthur can neatly be slotted into the Scottish landscape. Avalon, Camelot and Arthur's twelve recorded battles can all be shown to have had a Scottish context, as can legends such as the Round Table, Excalibur and The Sword in the Stone. 

If any of this was obvious, then there would have been nothing new or different for Ardrey to write.

As you read the author's account... you know that there will be many historians left unhappy with at least some of the conclusions. But given the problems many of those same historians have had finding convincing candidates for Arthur, what emerges from Ardrey's book has a sense of underlying rightness... we emerged with the strong sense that Adam Ardrey's Arthur comes closer to the real man behind the legend than any other interpretation we've read or seen."

Yup, thanks again Undiscovered Scotland.

 

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May 22, 2016

30th June 2015

Florence and Edinburgh and Arthur

Just back from Florence where I met the Provost of Edinburgh in the Palazzo Vecchio - all kitted out in full highland dress on a very hot day... the Provost, not me. He did Scotland proud.

The Florentines were celebrating the history of their city with men marching and women dancing, all in 15th c. costumes.

Scotland has a century of history it has still to celebrate - a time commonly called, somewhat vaguely, the Age of Arthur (because, until recently, it has been unidentified). The Age of Arthur was in fact set in history: 6th c. CE Scottish history.

Ever wondered why Arthur's Seat, Edinburgh, is called Arthur's Seat?

 

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May 22, 2016

18th June 2015

National Library Talk

Full house for my talk at the National Library of Scotland.

Great reception from an informed, and, more to the point, an interested-in-finding-out-more audience.

Met Mr Scott of Crammond Historical Society for the second time. We met for the first time when I was trying to find the real 'Merlin's Well' at Barnton (the magic spring of Barenton, according the magic-legends). I asked him, a random person, for directions, and he took the time to take me to the very place. That's how great people can be.

Another member of the audience kindly told me that she had been researching Arthur/Merlin for forty years and that I had an amazing amount of information and... well, she was going to read the books. 

It was a great day - thanks to the people of the National Library of Scotland and my daughter Kay who worked the Powerpoint and provided support and the best of company.

 

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May 22, 2016

17th June 2015

After five years of deciding not to decide Argyll Council asked for a business plan - 18 months after this was produced... not a peep: and so I wrote with a SAE (see below).

Now they have said they will discuss my proposal (so that they will have safety in numbers when they say No?).

Costs - next to nothing, press release and link on website.

Publicity-  guaranteed.

Potential - £millions.

And... we will see.

 

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May 22, 2016

National Library of Scotland today.

11th June 2015

Contra Hocus Pocus

"Mr. Ardrey

I want to thank you for all the work you have done towards your books, Finding Merlin, and Finding Arthur… I started my own quest for a historical basis (as I wanted to leave behind as much of the hocus pocus...as possible) for Merlin and Arthur…Nothing I found really seemed to hold any weight until I found a mention of you on a website referring to Blaise as Merlin's tutor. It all finally seemed to make sense from that point, and I devoured your books…Thank you for… everything you've already done,

J******* Mc****"

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May 22, 2016

10th June 2015

Arthur and the Loch Ness Monster

Five years ago I put it to Argyll Council that the matter of Arthur could boost tourism in Argyll.

This could have worked even if they did not think that the legendary Arthur was the historical Arthur Mac Aedan of Argyll. After all, there is no Loch Ness Monster and tourists still go to Loch Ness to see it.

At one meeting in Argyll I was told, "We have enough history." The implication being - we can't handle or we don't need any more history.

How can you have enough history?

Argyll Council have still not said No to my tourism suggestion. (I think they have decided No but they have not said this to me.) 

Two weeks ago I sent to the Council a stamped addressed envelope with a wee bit of paper in it with a No on it - all they had to do was tick a box and send it back.

And?

And nothing.

 

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May 22, 2016

6th June 2015

Argyll & National Library of Scotland

Still nothing from Argyll.

I have pussy-footed about the matter of Arthur for too long.

I have produced the evidence and expected people to consider it - Duh!

Almost everyone who has considered the evidence has accepted that Arthur was in fact, in history, a Scot.

The problem is, some people have vested interests:in the settlement the southern Arthur legend promotes; in Christianity; in not thinking about evidence.

Those who accept the traditional view are like religious people who believe in a 'truth' that has been revealed to them by some authorative body - and because it works for them.

The alternative is to go where the evidence leads. 

I have now decided to turn things round.

Next week, at the National Library, I will say Arthur and 'Merlin' were men of Scotland who were later mythologised. 

And if anyone disagrees...

 

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May 22, 2016

28th December 2014

If you know the truth and you know the legend...

The scene for the legend of Arthur and Merlin is commonly set in the south of Britain.

This southern British legend has no fixed time and place, far less historical figures who might have been Arthur and Merlin, because... well because in the south of Britain the legend is all there is.

The truth is Arthur and Merlin were historical figures. They were non-Christian men of late 6th century Scotland whose story was cynically amended and adopted for purely practical purposes.

The evidence that proves this is in Finding Merlin and Finding Arthur

Who needs the legend when the history is now available?

Actually it is a wonderful legend and so, I say, let us have both - why not?

PS There is no magic in Finding Merlin and Finding Arthur just evidence (because there is no such thing as magic).

 

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May 22, 2016

26th December 2014

How much more evidence do you need?

I only stopped writing my second book, Finding Arthur, because I had to deliver a manuscript to my publisher. I have not stopped finding Arthur: the evidence just keeps on coming.

A few weeks ago a German scholar made a find that corroborated my findings (see Blog).

Over the holidays, reading D.N. Dumville’s 1975 doctoral thesis, I found a reference to a source dated 1120 that says ‘Palatium Arthuri in terra Pictorum’ (page 893). That is, something akin to the Palatine Hill in Rome, something akin to the headquarters of Arthur in the land of the Picts.

This reference relates to a Roman building on the River Carron, Falkirk, known as Arthur’s Oven (destroyed c. 1743).

As I prove in Finding Arthur, the legendary Arthur’s last battle, the legendary battle of Camlann, was fought by the historical Arthur Mac Aedan at Camelon, Falkirk in 596CE.

Camlann/Camelon is two miles from the ‘Palatium Arthuri in terra Pictorum’.

This is not just a coincidence.

 

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